Documentation

Planned Expenditures

Planned PP Grant Expenditure – 2019/20
Planned PP Grant Expenditure – 2018/19
Planned PP Grant Expenditure – 2017/18
Planned PP Grant Expenditure – 2016/17
Planned PP Grant Expenditure – 2015/16

Impact Statements

PP Impact Statement – 2018/19
PP Impact Statement – 2017/18
PP Impact Statement – 2016/17
PP Impact Statement – 2015/16
PP Impact Statement – 2014/15

Pupil Premium Statement

Pupil Premium Analysis September 2019

Mount St Mary’s Catholic High School recognises that all our students, regardless of their background and socio-economic status should have an equal access to a curriculum.  This is to ensure they are able to make rapid and sustained progress, resulting in the attainment of outstanding GCSE outcomes.

Our goal is to ensure all students have a valid progression route and are able to secure places at outstanding Post-16 educational providers. High quality impartial Careers Education Information Advice and Guidance is given to all students to ensure that they make appropriate, informed choices and that they make a smooth transition on to Post-16 programmes of study and apprenticeship programmes.

The pupil premium is additional funding given to publicly funded schools and academies in England, to enable them to support their disadvantaged pupils to maximise their progress and close the attainment gap between them and their peers.

The following students are eligible for the £935.00 Pupil Premium funding:

  • Students known to have been eligible for Free School Meals (FSM) in any of the previous six years (FSM6), as well as those first known to be eligible at the time of the census (FSM).

Pupil Premium allocation 2017-18:  Total PP funding received this year £425,256.00

Please refer to the Pupil Premium costed development plan to view the strategies implemented over the course of the 2018-19 academic year.

Overall Evaluation:

From 2016, the primary indicator of school performance became Progress 8. The headline measures that appear in the 2019 performance tables will be:

  • Progress across 8 subjects
  • Attainment across the same 8 subjects
  • Percentage of pupils achieving the threshold in English and Mathematics. A grade 4 will be referred to as a ‘standard pass’ and a grade 5 as a ‘good pass’
  • Percentage of pupils achieving the English Baccalaureate.

Key Points to note:

The PP cohort came to us with stronger starting points in comparison to the previous years PP cohort. The average KS2 point score was 4.63 compared to the 2018 PP score of 4.26. Non PP students in comparison came with an average KS2 point score of 4.72, slightly down on 2018 Non PP average of 4.75. The gap -0.09 has narrowed between the 2 cohorts in comparison to a 2018 gap of -0.49.

Progress 8

Progress 8 is calculated by determining each student’s performance across a range of eight different subjects (English, Mathematics, three EBacc subjects, (please see below), and three other GCSE or high quality GCSE equivalent outcomes) and then comparing this performance to the attainment of other

students nationally who started secondary school with a similar Key Stage 2 results profile. A student will achieve a positive Progress 8 score if their performance is above that of other students nationally and a negative Progress 8 score if their performance is below that of other students nationally. Individual Progress 8 scores will be aggregated to give a Progress 8 score for each school.

The impact of students’ Progress 8 score

Measure GCSE Results 2019 (Provisional) GCSE Results 2018 GCSE Results 2017 GCSE Results 2016
Progress 8 All Students -0.028 -0.083 -0.024 -0.240
Progress 8 PP Students -0.215 -0.155 -0.221 -0.480
Progress 8  Non PP Students 0.175 -0.019 0.145 0.000
Progress 8 gap -0.390 -0.136 -0.366 -0.480

 Key Points

  • The progress 8 measure indicates that the PP cohort are in line with 2017 outcomes.
  • The gap between PP students and non PP students has reduced since 2016.
  • The PP cohort have made better progress across 4 years compared to non PP.

Attainment 8

Attainment 8 measures the achievement of a pupil across 8 qualifications including Mathematics (double weighted) and English (double weighted).

 The impact of students Attainment 8 score

Measure GCSE Results 2019 (Provisional) GCSE Results 2018 GCSE Results 2017 GCSE Results 2016
Attainment 8 All Students 42.19 39.94 41.24 45.64
Attainment 8 PP Students 39.60 35.20 36.70 41.0
Attainment 8 Non PP Students 44.61 44.02 45.29 50.38
Attainment 8 gap -5.01 -8.82 -8.59 -9.38

 Key points:

  • The Attainment 8 gap has reduced this year and is at its smallest in 4 years.
  • Attainment 8 is at a 3 year high in 2019.
  • Attainment 8 has increased more for PP students by an average 4.40 pts in comparison to the slight increase for Non PP.

The impact on students securing at a ‘strong pass’ Grade 4 / legacy C grade in English and Mathematics.

Measure GCSE Results 2019 (Provisional) GCSE Results 2018 GCSE Results 2017 GCSE Results 2016
9-5 EM All Students 34.5% 30.5% 36% 15%
9-5 EM PP Students 27.4% 22.2% 22.2% 5.49%
9-5 EM Non PP Students 41.1% 37.5% 48.4% 24.7%
9-5 EM gap -13.7 -15.3 -26.2 -19.21

 Key Points

  • The percentage of students in receipt of Pupil Premium funding attaining at least a ‘strong pass’ in English and Mathematics has increased by 22% since 2016. The gap is now at its smallest in four years.
  • There has been upward shifts in the percentages of disadvantaged students attaining 9-5 grades across most curriculum areas within the 2019 GCSE dataset.

The impact on students securing at least a ‘standard pass’ Grade 4 / legacy C grade in English and Mathematics.

Measure GCSE Results 2019 (Provisional) GCSE Results 2018 GCSE Results 2017 GCSE Results 2016
9-4 EM All Students 60.3% 53.2% 58.1% 49.2%
9-4 EM PP Students 57.1% 38.8% 46.2% 33.7%
9-4 EM Non PP Students 63.3% 65.6% 68.1% 65.2%
9-4 EM gap -6.2 -26.8 -21.2 -31.5

 Key Points

  • The percentage of students in receipt of Pupil Premium funding attaining at least a ‘standard pass’ in English and Mathematics has increased by 23.4% since 2016. This is impressive considering the introduction of reformed GCSEs and the cohort of disadvantaged students increasing over time.
  • The gap has reduced since 2016 by 25% and is at its smallest across four years.
  • There has been upward shifts in the percentages of disadvantaged students attaining 9-4 grades across most curriculum areas within the 2019 GCSE dataset.

Attendance data for the academic year 2017-8:   Half Terms 1-6

Year Gp Cohort PP Non PP Gap PP to Non-PP No OTL PP Non PP Gap PP to Non-PP
7 97.01 96.85 97.15 0.30 97.01 96.85 97.15 0.30
8 95.78 94.85 96.81 1.95 96.61 96.05 97.20 1.15
9 95.88 94.84 96.97 2.13 96.66 96.37 96.97 0.61
10 95.77 94.13 97.57 3.45 96.75 95.99 97.57 1.59
11 92.94 89.23 96.54 7.31 96.21 95.00 97.28 2.27

 Key Points

  • Although the gaps remain high in the older year groups, the attendance for Y7-Y9 is above 95% for PP students.
  • The PP attendance data is influenced by a small cohort of PAs. This is evident when these outliers are removed.
  • Following the Attendance review in January 2017 there were on average 70-80 students absent each day.
  • For the year 2017-18 there were on average 30-40 students absent each day and in 2018-19 this was reduced to 25-35.

When Persistent Absentee rates are considered

 Pupil Premium Students        PA 12.7% (OLR 9.3%)            WBri PA 17.1%   (OLR =12.8%)

School Vision

Pupil premium will be used for targeted pupils through strategic activities and provision to support us in achieving our whole school vision.

Principles of Provision at MSM

  • We ensure that all teaching and learning opportunities meet the needs of all students.
  • We ensure that appropriate provision is made for students who belong to vulnerable groups – this includes ensuring that the needs of socially disadvantaged students area adequately assessed and addressed.
  • In making provision for socially disadvantaged students, we recognise that not all students in receipt of free school meals will be socially disadvantaged. We also recognise not all students who are socially disadvantaged are registered for, or qualify for, free school meals. We reserve the right to allocate the Funding for Inclusion (FFI) to support any student or groups of students the school has evidence of being socially disadvantaged.
  • FFI will be allocated following a needs analysis, which will identify priority classes, groups or individuals. The nature of funding and resources means that not all students in receipt of free school meals will be following Pupil Premium interventions at one time.

Provision

The range of provision the Governors may consider making for this group may include:

  • Reducing class size through additional staffing, thus improving opportunities for effective teaching and learning and accelerating progress.
  • Provision of small group work with appropriate practitioners focussing on overcoming gaps in learning and barriers to learning.
  • Employment of additional specifically trained TAs to support in Literacy, Numeracy and EAL, in order to improve access to learning and progress.
  • Additional teaching and learning opportunities provided through trained TAs or external agencies.
  • 1:1 support for identified students.
  • Access to specific one off events or programmes of provision at key intervention points.
  • All our work through FFI will be aimed at accelerating progress, moving children to at least age related expectations. Initially this will be in communication, Literacy, English, Maths and Science.
  • Provision for statemented students will not be facilitated through the Funding for Inclusion (FFI) Stream.

Reporting

It will be the responsibility of the Headteacher, or delegated member of staff, to produce regular reports for the Governors on:

  • The progress made towards narrowing the gap, by year group, for identified groups.
  • A schematic of developing provision.
  • An evaluation of the cost effectiveness and value for money.

The Governors will ensure the school publishes an annual statement on FFI, its use and impact.

Appeal

Any appeals against processes referred to in this statement should be made through the Governors’ complaints procedure.